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Secondary systemic amyloidosis

Amyloidosis - secondary systemic

Secondary systemic amyloidosis is a disorder in which abnormal proteins build up in tissues and organs. Clumps of the abnormal proteins are called amyloid deposits.

Secondary means it occurs because of another disease or situation. For example, this condition usually occurs as a result of chronic infection or chronic inflammatory disease. Primary amyloidosis means there is no disease that is causing the condition.

Systemic means that the disease affects the entire body.

Images

Amyloidosis on the fingers
Amyloidosis on the face
Antibodies

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Causes

The exact cause of amyloidosis is unknown. You are more likely to develop secondary systemic amyloidosis if you have a long-term infection or inflammation.

This condition may occur with:

Symptoms

Symptoms of secondary systemic amyloidosis depend on which body tissue is affected by the protein deposits. These deposits damage normal tissues, leading to the symptoms or signs of this illness:

Exams and Tests

Tests that may be done include:

Treatment

The condition that is causing the amyloidosis should be treated. In some cases, the drug colchicine or a biologic drug (medicine that treats the immune system) is prescribed.

Outlook (Prognosis)

How well a person does depends on which organs are affected and whether the disease that is causing it can be controlled. If the disease involves the heart and kidneys, it may lead to organ failure and death.

Possible Complications

Health problems that may result from secondary systemic amyloidosis include:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of this condition. The following are serious symptoms that need prompt medical attention:

Prevention

If you have a disease that is known to increase your risk for this condition, make sure you get it treated. This may help prevent amyloidosis.

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References

Gertz MA. Amyloidosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 188.

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Review Date: 5/3/2015  

Reviewed By: Laura J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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