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Knee arthroscopy

Knee scope - arthroscopic lateral retinacular release; Synovectomy - knee; Patellar (knee) debridement; Meniscus repair; Lateral release; Knee surgery; Meniscus-arthroscopy; Collateral ligament-arthroscopy;

Knee arthroscopy is surgery that uses a tiny camera to look inside your knee. Small cuts are made to insert the camera and small surgical tools into your knee for the procedure.

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Knee arthroscopy

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Knee arthroscopy - series

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Description

Three different types of pain relief (anesthesia) may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery:

A cuff-like device may be put around your thigh to help control bleeding during the procedure.

The surgeon will make two or three small cuts around your knee. Salt water (saline) will be pumped into your knee to inflate the knee.

A narrow tube with a tiny camera on the end will be inserted through one of the cuts. The camera is attached to a video monitor that lets the surgeon see inside the knee.

The surgeon may put other small surgery tools inside your knee through the other cuts. The surgeon will then fix or remove the problem in your knee.

At the end of your surgery, the saline will be drained from your knee. The surgeon will close your cuts with sutures (stitches) and cover them with a dressing. Many surgeons take pictures of the procedure from the video monitor, You may be able to view these pictures after the operation so that you can see what was done.

Why the Procedure Is Performed

Arthroscopy may be recommended for these knee problems:

Risks

The risks for anesthesia and surgery are:

Additional risks for this surgery include:

Before the Procedure

Always tell your health care provider what medicines you are taking, even drugs, supplements, or herbs you bought without a prescription.

During the 2 weeks before your surgery:

On the day of your surgery:

After the Procedure

You will have an ace bandage on your knee over the dressing. Most people go home the same day they have surgery. Your provider will give you exercises to do.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Full recovery after knee arthroscopy will depend on what type of problem was treated.

Problems such as a torn meniscus, broken cartilage, Baker's cyst, and problems with the synovium are often easily fixed. Many people stay active after these surgeries.

Recovery from simple procedures is fast in most cases. You may need to use crutches for a while after some types of surgery. Your provider may also prescribe pain medicine.

Recovery will take longer if you have had a more complex procedure. If parts of your knee have been repaired or rebuilt, you may not be able to walk without crutches or a knee brace for several weeks. Full recovery may take several months to a year.

If you also have arthritis in your knee, you will still have arthritis symptoms after surgery to repair other damage to your knee.

Related Information

Meniscus tears
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury
Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury
Medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury of the knee
Lateral collateral ligament (LCL) injury
Baker’s cyst
Knee pain
ACL reconstruction
Meniscal allograft transplantation
Knee microfracture surgery
Surgical wound care - open
ACL reconstruction - discharge
Knee arthroscopy - discharge
Getting your home ready - knee or hip surgery

References

Griffin JW, Hart JA, Thompson SR, Miller MD. Basics of knee arthroscopy. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 94.

Phillips BB, Mihalko MJ. Arthroscopy of the lower extremity. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics. 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 51.

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Review Date: 3/5/2015  

Reviewed By: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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