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Nausea and vomiting - adults

Emesis; Vomiting; Stomach upset; Upset stomach; Queasiness

Nausea is feeling an urge to vomit. It is often called "being sick to your stomach."

Vomiting or throwing-up is forcing the contents of the stomach up through the esophagus and out of the mouth.

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Digestive system

I Would Like to Learn About:

Causes

Many common problems may cause nausea and vomiting, including:

Nausea and vomiting may also be early warning signs of more serious medical problems, such as:

Home Care

Once you and your health care provider find the cause, you will want to know how to treat your nausea or vomiting. You may need to take medicine, change your diet, or try other things to make you feel better.

It is very important to keep enough fluids in your body. Try drinking frequent, small amounts of clear liquids.

If you have morning sickness during pregnancy, ask your provider about possible treatments.

The following may help treat motion sickness:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call 911 or go to an emergency room if:

Call a provider right away or seek medical care if you or another person has:

Signs of dehydration include:

What to Expect at Your Office Visit

Your provider will perform a physical exam and will look for signs of dehydration.

Your provider will ask questions about your symptoms, such as:

Other questions you may be asked include:

The diagnostic tests may be performed:

Depending on the cause and how much extra fluids you need, you may have to stay in the hospital or clinic for a period of time. You may need fluids given through your veins (intravenous or IV).

Related Information

Dehydration
Diarrhea - overview
Diet - clear liquid
Diet - full liquid

References

Malagelada J-R, Malagelada C. Nausea and vomiting. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 15.

Mcquaid K. Approach to the patient with gastrointestinal disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 132.

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Review Date: 8/14/2015  

Reviewed By: Subodh K. Lal, MD, gastroenterologist at Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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