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Abdominal mass

Mass in the abdomen

An abdominal mass is swelling in one part of the belly area (abdomen).

Images

Anatomical landmarks, front view
Digestive system
Fibroid tumors
Aortic aneurysm

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Considerations

An abdominal mass is most often found during a routine physical exam. Most of the time the mass develops slowly. You may not be able to feel the mass.

Locating the pain helps your health care provider make a diagnosis. For example, the abdomen can be divided into four areas:

Other terms used to find the location of abdominal pain or masses include:

The location of the mass and its firmness, texture, and other qualities can provide clues to its cause.

Causes

Several conditions can cause an abdominal mass:

Home Care

All abdominal masses should be examined as soon as possible by the health care provider.

Changing your body position may help relieve pain due to an abdominal mass.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Get medical help right away if you have a pulsating lump in your abdomen along with severe abdominal pain. This could be a sign of a ruptured aortic aneurysm, which is an emergency condition.

Contact your health care provider if you notice any type of abdominal mass.

What to Expect at Your Office Visit

In nonemergency situations, your health care provider will perform a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms and medical history.

In an emergency situation, you will be stabilized first. Then, your provider will examine your abdomen and ask questions about your symptoms and medical history, such as:

A pelvic or rectal exam may be needed in some cases. Tests that may be done to find the cause of an abdominal mass include:

Related Information

Physical examination
Abscess
Aneurysm
Tumor

References

Mcquaid K. Approach to the patient with gastrointestinal disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 134.

Squires RA, Postier RG. Acute abdomen. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery. 19th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 47.

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Review Date: 11/2/2014  

Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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