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Bone lesion biopsy

Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone

A bone lesion biopsy is the removal of a piece of bone or bone marrow for examination.

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Bone biopsy

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How the Test is Performed

The test is done in the following way:

Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia to remove a larger sample. Then surgery to remove the bone can be done if the biopsy exam shows that there is an abnormal growth or cancer.

How to Prepare for the Test

You may be told not to drink or eat anything for several hours before the biopsy.

How the Test will Feel

With a needle biopsy, you may feel some discomfort and pressure, even though a local anesthetic is used. You must remain still during the procedure.

After the biopsy, the area may be sore or tender for several days.

Why the Test is Performed

The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to tell the difference between cancerous and noncancerous bone tumors and to identify other bone problems. It may be performed on people with bone pain and tenderness, particularly if x-ray, CT scan, or other testing reveals a problem.

Normal Results

Normal bone appears as two types: compact and cancellous.

What Abnormal Results Mean

Benign (noncancerous) bone tumors include:

Cancerous tumors include:

Abnormal results may also be due to:

Risks

Some people with bone disorders also have blood clotting disorders, which can increase the risk for bleeding.

Considerations

Signs of bone infection (one of the most serious risks) include fever, headache, pain with movement, redness and swelling of the tissues around the biopsy site, and drainage of pus from the biopsy site. If these occur, seek immediate medical attention.

Related Information

Benign
Bone tumor
Bone pain or tenderness
X-ray
CT scan
Cyst
Multiple myeloma
Osteosarcoma
Ewing sarcoma
Osteomalacia
Osteitis fibrosa
Histoplasmosis
Osteomyelitis
Rickets

References

Matteson EL, Osmon DR. Infections of the bursae, joints, and bones. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 280.

Schwartz HS, Holt GE. Bone tumors. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery. 19th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 34.

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Review Date: 9/8/2014  

Reviewed By: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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