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Getting yourself healthy before surgery

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Even if you have been to many doctors, you know more about your symptoms and health history than anyone else. Your health care providers depend on you to tell them things they need to know.

Being healthy for surgery helps make sure the operation and your recovery go smoothly. Below are tips and reminders.

What to Tell your Doctors Before Surgery

Tell the doctors who will be involved with your surgery about:

If you get a cold, the flu, a fever, herpes breakout or another illness in the few days before surgery, call your surgeon right away. Your surgery may need to be rescheduled.

Preoperative Exam

Before your surgery, you will need to have a physical exam done.

Some hospitals will also have you visit with an anesthesia provider at the hospital before surgery.

Find Out How you Should Manage your Medicines

Bring a list of medicines you are taking with you every time you see a provider. This includes medicines you bought without a prescription and medicines you do not take every day. Include information on the dose and how often you take your medicines.

Your providers will need to know about any alternative treatments you have had. Tell them about any vitamins, supplements, minerals, or natural medicines you are taking, as well.

Two weeks before surgery, you may need to stop taking medicines that make put you at risk of bleeding during surgery. Medicines includes aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Naprosyn, Aleve), and other drugs.

Ask your doctor which medicines you should still take on the day of your surgery.

Manage your Medical Problems

If you have diabetes, heart disease, or other medical problems, your surgeon will have you see the doctors who treat you for these problems. Your risk of problems after surgery will be lower if you have diabetes and other medical conditions under control before surgery.

You may not be able to have dental work for 3 months after certain surgeries (joint replacement or heart valve surgery). So be sure to schedule your dental work before your surgery.

If you smoke, you need to stop. Ask your health care provider for help. Smoking will slow down your healing after surgery.

Tell all your providers that you are having surgery. They may suggest a change in your medicines before your operation.

References

Beauchamp RD, Higgins MS. Perioperative patient safety. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery. 19th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 10.

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Review Date: 10/24/2014  

Reviewed By: Debra G. Wechter, MD, FACS, General Surgery practice specializing in breast cancer, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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