Click here to return to the LMHS Home Page

 
 
Home
 
Services
 
Hospital Locations
 

Physician Search

Choose a search method from the list below:

 

Health Information

Frequently Asked Questions about Knee Replacement

What is arthritis and why does it hurt my knee?
What is a total knee replacement?
What is the success rate for knee replacements?
What is Partial or Uni-compartment knee replacement?
Will I need blood?
Do I need to be put to sleep for this surgery?
How long until I can drive and get back to normal?
When will I be able to get back to work?
How often will I need to be seen by my doctor following the surgery?
Do you recommend any restrictions following this surgery?
Will I notice anything different about my knee?
 

What is arthritis and why does it hurt my knee?

The leading cause of joint pain, Osteoarthritis, is also known as degenerative joint disease. The cartilage that serves as a cushion and allows for smooth motion of the knee breaks down and wears away. Eventually it wears down to bone. Rubbing of bone against bone causes discomfort, swelling and stiffness.

Back to Top

What is a total knee replacement

A knee replacement is a surgical procedure in which the surgeon removes the damaged bone and cartilage at the ends of the bones in your joint and replaces it with artificial parts. The goal of knee replacement is to allow you to move easily with less discomfort.

Back to Top

What is the success rate for knee replacements?

Ninety-four to 96 percent of patients achieve good to excellent results with relief of discomfort and significantly increased activity and mobility.

Back to Top

What is Partial or Uni-compartment knee replacement?

A Partial or Uni-compartmental knee replacement is a procedure in which only one of the three compartments in the knee is repaired. Candidates for this procedure have arthritis primarily in the medial compartment of the knee. Your surgeon will determine if this is the right procedure for you.

Back to Top

Will I need blood?

The majority of knee replacement patients do not require a transfusion after surgery. Some patients may want to donate their own blood prior to surgery for use after surgery. Your surgeon will be happy to discuss these issues with you.

Back to Top

Do I need to be put to sleep for this surgery?

You may have a general anesthetic, which most people call "being put to sleep." Some patients prefer to have spinal or epidural anesthetic that numbs your leg only and does not require you to be asleep. The choice is between you and the anesthesiologist.

Back to Top

How long until I can drive and get back to normal?

The ability to drive depends on whether surgery was on your right leg or your left leg, and the type of car you have. If the surgery was on your left leg and you have an automatic transmission, you could be driving at two weeks if you are not taking narcotics. If the surgery was on your right leg, your driving could be restricted for as short as two weeks or as long as six weeks. Getting "back to normal" will depend on your progress. Consult with your surgeon or therapist for their advice on your activity.

Back to Top

When will I be able to get back to work?

We recommend that most people take at least one month off from work, unless their jobs are quite sedentary and they can return to work with crutches on the job.

Back to Top

How often will I need to be seen by my doctor following the surgery?

You will be seen for your first post-operative office visit two weeks after surgery. The frequency of follow-up visits will depend on your progress. Many patients are seen at two weeks, six weeks, twelve weeks, three months and then yearly intervals.

Back to Top

Do you recommend any restrictions following this surgery?

Yes. High-impact activities, such as running, singles tennis and basketball are not recommended. Injury-prone sports such as downhill skiing are also dangerous for the new joint.

Back to Top

Will I notice anything different about my knee?

Yes. You may have a small area of numbness to the outside of the scar that may last a year or more and is not serious. Kneeling may be uncomfortable for a year or more, but you can kneel if you want to. Some patients notice some clicking when they move their knee. This is the result of the artificial surfaces coming together and is not serious. You may notice that your knee is warm for up to one year, again, this is not unusual. It is your knee healing from the surgery.

Back to Top

 

Links to Services

FAQs about Hip Replacement

FAQs about Knee Replacement

Resources

Orthopedic & Spine Services

Lee Memorial Hospital

All-Star Total Joint Home Page

LMHS Home Page

 

home  |  about us  |  services  |  locations  | employmentpatient billing  |  press room  |  events  |  foundation

HIPAA | privacy policy | did you find it? | medical staff | send a link | get well card