Click here to return to the LMHS Home Page

 

Back to home

Pediatric Audiology

Early Identification of Hearing Problems Key to Development

Hearing Problems Key to Development Hearing is an important element in a child’s social, emotional and cognitive development. Various types and degrees of hearing disorders—even partial impairment—can cause communication, learning or social problems. Judy Bero, doctor of audiology, at Golisano Children’s Hospital of Southwest Florida provides a variety of diagnostic hearing evaluations.

“I complete audiological evaluations for children and infants of all ages, as well as adults,” Dr. Bero says. “Early identification and treatment of hearing loss is essential in order for a child to learn language, and for an older child to be successful with learning and socializing at school.”

Children can be born with hearing loss or acquire issues as they age. Examples of risk factors for infant hearing loss include premature birth, low birth weight, severe jaundice or a family history of ear problems, among others. For children, some examples of risk factors include chronic ear infections, a head injury or certain medications.

Hearing loss is the most frequently occurring birth defect worldwide, and newborn hearing screenings have been mandated in Florida for more than a decade. An infant who fails a newborn hearing screening should be seen right away by an audiologist, like Dr. Bero. “Some hearing impairments can be temporary and some can be permanent,” Dr. Bero says. “It is very important to differentiate between the two.”

An infant who does not get startled by a loud noise or a toddler who does not turn around when called may indicate a sign of hearing impairment. Other signs of hearing loss include:

  • Sitting close to the television
  • Teaching your children the substances they cannot touch
  • Speech disorders
  • Teaching your children the substances they cannot touch
  • Saying ‘what’ frequently
  • Teaching your children the substances they cannot touch
  • Regularly needing others to repeat things

Sometimes, teachers are the first to notice that a child is not hearing properly, so if a parent receives a note from the teacher, it should be taken seriously.

Dr. Bero offers a variety of methods to test hearing, and she determines the best method based on the child’s age, development and health status. Based on the test results, recommendations are made and may include referral to a physician, hearing aids, speech therapy and/or preferential seating in school.

Hearing evaluations are painless procedures and should be considered if there are any questions about an infant’s or child’s ability to hear.

spacer

“Sometimes, teachers are the first to notice that a child is not hearing properly, so if a parent receives a note from the teacher, it should be taken seriously,”
Dr. Bero says.

Judy Bero, Au.D.
Pediatric Audiology
Golisano Children’s Hospital of Southwest Florida
Children’s Rehabilitation Center*
15901 Bass Road, Suite 104
Fort Myers, FL 33908
239-343-6690

Golisano Children’s Hospital of Southwest Florida
Children’s Rehabilitation Center
1265 Creekside Parkway, Suite 200
Naples, FL 34108
239-254-4260

*An outpatient department of Lee Memorial Hospital

spacer